great Rock Melodico review translated

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Our friends from Rock Melodico have written a great review for Lonely Desert. But since Spanish is not my best language, here a translation to English:

Forest Field and a job of excellence in “Lonely Desert”

Alex Socco, November 10, 2016

Forest Field are back with their fourth studio work released by the Rock Company label. And saying Forest Field is talking about Dutchman Peter Cox, the brain and mentor of this project which is completed by the voice of Phil Vincent (Cranston, Tragik). Then all the instruments were recorded by Cox at Down the Road Studios in Holland. And what’s more is to say that Cox composed all the songs.

So what about ‘Lonely Desert’? First, it is a step forward in quality with respect to the previous ‘Angels?’, already reviewed on these pages. The songs have more consistency, the production is superior and also the compositions. It is a work that mixes – as Forest Field have always done – progressive rock and melodic rock with more experimental parts and this is the best to date. There are a coiuple of instrumental tracks and the rest are adorned by Vincent’s voice, while the lyrics are based on Frank Herbert’s ‘The Chronicles of Dune’.

Within the songs, we have the initial “Valley of Pain”, probably one of the best ever for its melancholic melody, brilliantly vocalized by Vincent. “Coriolis” is an introspective instrumental with a crescendo in rhythm and a guitar solo at the end that really explodes. “Doomed In The Desert” is a ballad adorned with piano and here it is noticed that the vocalist feels more at ease with this type of records. “Alienation (Stranger In Me)” also has that melodic imprint in half-time format, more rock and with good choirs.

“To Bits” is an instrumental with subtle arpeggios of guitars, while “Asleep” is pure melodic rock, soft and dreamy. We also have something more heavy on “Into The Light”, with more sharp guitars and then follows “Riding the Worm”, the last of the instrumental tracks, more experimental with delicate arrangements of keyboards and works of guitars similar to David Gilmour. “The Confrontation” returns the classic melodic hard rock and the album ends with “Fear”, which mixes hard rock, AOR and prog, all in the same cocktail.

Last year we did an interview with Peter Cox, where he described Forest Field as a project of “good melodies, many harmonies, guitar works, elaborate arrangements, mellotron and hammond sounds and varied songs.”

As always, it is necessary to listen to the album more often to appreciate the work in its entirety. I would also say something to Peter Cox: it is time to make a purely instrumental record with “Coriolis” as a base of influence and for heads to fly.

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